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UConn students present original research at prestigious event (Released: 5/20/96)

The following is from separate news releases to hometown newspapers. Students are listed alphabetically.

by David Pesci, Office of University Communications.

STORRS, Conn. -- Aimee Criscuolo of Woodbridge was among the presenters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions at the event. Included was Criscuolo, who presented her study titled, "The Parental Behavior of Virgin Nulliparous Naked Mole Rates (heterocephalus glaber) and Dwarf Siberian Hamsters: The Effects of Hormone Estradiol and Sensitization on their Behaviors."

Criscuolo, a student in the University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, received a bachelor of science degree May 18.

STORRS, Conn. -- Karen Fish of Glastonbury was among the pres enters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions at the event. Included was Fish, who presented her study titled, "Effects of Hydration State on Plasma Testosterone and Cortisol Concentrations During Exercise in Highly Fit Collegiate Runners."

Fish's study showed that when elite athletes became dehydrated, their bodies entered a catabolic state which led to breakdown in muscle tissue. She was able to measure this by examining and contrasting the hormonal levels of testosterone and cortisol produced by the athletes during their exercise periods.

Fish, 22, was a student in the University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and a member of the University's diving team. She received a bachelor of science degree May 18. She will attend Harvad Medical School in the fall.

STORRS, Conn. -- Derek Fong of Newtown was among the presenters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions at the event. Included was Fong, who presented his study titled, "Folding Assembly of Phage P22 Cold Sensitive Protein Mutants."

The study examined protein folding in Phage P22, a component of DNA which has implications for the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

Fong, a student in the University's College of Liberal Arts and Scie nces, received a bachelor of science degree May 18.

STORRS, Conn. -- Benjamin Freda, a resident of Port Chester, N.Y., was among the presenters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions at the event. Included was Freda, who presented his study titled, "The Anatomical Distribution of Peyer's Patches in the Rabbit Small Intestine and the Final Two Meters of the Human Ileum."

Freda received his bachelor of science degree at the University's Spring commencement on May 18.

STORRS, Conn. -- Three Simsbury residents were among the presenters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions. Included were presentations by Ira Galin, who offered his study "Regulation of Neocortical Neurogenisis by Neuronal Activity;" Kathy Kurdish, who discussed her findings of "Mitochondrial DNA Variation Across a 3 Gene Region (COII, ATPase 6, ATPase 8, COIIIB, and tRNA's lysine and aspartic acid): Restriction Fragment Length Analysis of Chrysoperla lucasina in Europe;" and Frederik Vannberg, who presented his study of "Cytogenic Characterization of 17q21."

All three students in the University's College of liberal arts and sciences, received bachelor of science degrees May 18.

STORRS, Conn. -- Andrew Gutterman of Windsor was among the presenters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions at the event. Included was Gutterman, who presented his study titled, "Preferred Habitat Characteristics of Rufus-sided Towhees - Links to Population Decline."

Gutterman's study examined the nesting places of the rufus-sided towhee on Cape Cod. The bird is one of the most rapidly declining species in North America. Gutterman was looking for clues that could tell him why this was so. What he found was that the towhee, a type of sparrow, thrived in the brushy habitat that used to be characteristic of the Cape's shoreline. However, Gutterman found that the proliferation of residential development and other changes in the coastal enivironment have reduced the nesting and breeding of the towhees.

Gutterman, a student in the University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, received a bachelor of science degree May 18.

STORRS, Conn. -- Charlene Houle of Waterbury was among the presenters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions at the event. Included was Houle, who presented her study titled, "Invertebrate Conservation Efforts in New England."

Houle examined invertebrate species listed as rare in New England and profiled several organisms protected by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service.

Houle, a student in the University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, received a bachelor of science degree May 18 .

STORRS, Conn. -- Valerie McKenzie of Monroe was among the presenters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions at the event. Included was McKenzie, who presented her study titled, "Three New Species of Tapeworms from the Longnose Sawshark, Pristiophorus cirratus, and their Modes of Attachment to the Mucosal Surface of the Spiral Intestine."

During her study, McKenzie identified three new species of tapeworm that affect the longnose sawshark, a fish indigenous to the waters off Australia. One of the tapeworms McKenzie discovered had never been seen by a human being before and represented a previously undiscovered genus.

She will present her findings at the national meeting of the American Association of Parasitologists (AAP) in Tucson, Ariz., on May 31.

McKenzie, who is 21 and a student in the University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, spent most of May as a research scientist on the research vessel Pelican, which will dock at Woods Hole, Mass., the day after the University's Commencement ceremonies May 18. After presenting at the AAP conference, she will embark on another research study on the waters off Mexico's Baja peninsula.

STORRS, Conn. -- Katherine Miller of North Granby was among the presenters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions at the event. Included was Miller, who presented her study titled, "Out of the Tethys: A Phylogeny of Posidonia (Posidoniaceae)."

Miller's study examined several species of Posidonia, a flowering marine plant, in hopes of tracing its evolutionary history. To achieve her goal, she examined each species' DNA sequences and compared them using DNA sequencing to try and determine the evolutionary path they followed to their present ecosystems.

Miller, a student in the University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, received a bachelor of science degree May 18.

STORRS, Conn. -- Jennifer Morris of Redding was among the presenters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions at the event. Included was Morris, who presented her study titled, "Conservation Genetics and Molecular Systematics of the Damselfly Genus Megalagrion."

Morris completed her requirements for a bachelor of science degree from the University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in December.

STORRS, Conn. -- Uptal Munshi of Hamden was among the presenters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions at the event. Included was Munshi, who discussed his study titled "Characterization of a Histone Gene Repeat in Drospohila Virilis from a 7.7 kb Subclone."

Munshi, a student in the University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, received a bachelor of science degree May 18.

STORRS, Conn. -- Karen Potter of Vernon was among the presenters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions at the event. Included was Potter, who presented her study titled, "The Characterization and Sequencing of Heat Shock Protein 70 Homologue in Dictyostelium discoideum."

Potter, a student in the University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, received a bachelor of science degree May 18.

STORRS, Conn. -- Steve Resch of Norwalk was among the presen ters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions at the event. Included was Resch, who discussed his study titled " Diversity of Frankia in New Zealand Root Nodules."

Resch examined root clusters of coriaria plants, which are indigenous to New Zealand, for a symbiotic nitrogen-converting bacteria known as Frankia. He compared DNA sequences of a gene common to coriaria and discovered, among other things, that the bacteria seems to be co-evolving with their plant hosts.

Resch, a student in the University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, received a bachelor of science degree May 18.

STORRS, Conn. -- Jon Swanson of Columbia was among the presenters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions at the event. Included was Swanson, who presented his study titled, "A Revision of the Genus Phoreibothrium (Tetraphyllidea: Onchobothriidae) with Descriptions of 5 New Species."

The study examined the evolutionary relationships between parasitic tapeworms in the genus Phoreibothrium and certain species of sharks. Swanson discovered five new species of tapeworms previously undescribed that were affecting the sharks. He will present his findings at the national meeting of the American Association of Parasitologists in Tuscon, Ariz., at the end of May.

Swanson, a student in the University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, received a bachelor of science degree May 18.

STORRS, Conn. -- Sereena Tamburri of Plainfield was among the presenters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions at the event. Included was Tamburri, who presented her study titled, "Studies on the Early Development in Interspecific Hybrid Embryos of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans."

Tamburri, a student in the University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, received a bachelor of science degree May 18.

STORRS, Conn. -- Gaines Tyler of Mystic was among the presenters at the 14th annual Biology Undergraduate Research Colloquium at the University of Connecticut.

The prestigious colloquium provides students with a forum to present findings from their own original research to peers, faculty and the University community. The research projects are often of the caliber done by master's students or even doctoral candidates.

This year 19 students were asked to share their findings and conclusions at the event. Included was Tyler, who presented his study titled, "Descriptions of Three New Species of Echinobothrium (Cestoda: Diphyllidea) with Examination of Surface Structure Using Light and Scanning Microscopy."

The study revealed three new species of tapeworms affecting stingrays. Tyler examined the surfaces of the three worms using a scanning electron microscope and discovered the presence of minute hand-shaped microtriches, which he believes are useful as taxonomic characters.

Tyler, a student in the University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, received a bachelor of science degree May 18.

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